10 contractions - Group 01

Here are 10 different contractions with full details about each one: (G01)

1. "I'm" - This is a contraction of "I am". It is commonly used in spoken and written English to represent the first person singular subject pronoun "I" followed by the auxiliary verb "am". For example, "I'm going to the store".

2. "Can't" - This is a contraction of "cannot". It is used to represent the negative form of the modal verb "can". For example, "I can't go to the party tonight".

3. "Don't" - This is a contraction of "do not". It is used to represent the negative form of the auxiliary verb "do". For example, "I don't like broccoli".

4. "Won't" - This is a contraction of "will not". It is used to represent the negative form of the auxiliary verb "will". For example, "I won't be able to make it to the meeting".

5. "Shouldn't" - This is a contraction of "should not". It is used to represent the negative form of the modal verb "should". For example, "You shouldn't eat too much junk food".

6. "Couldn't" - This is a contraction of "could not". It is used to represent the negative form of the modal verb "could". For example, "I couldn't find my keys this morning".

7. "Isn't" - Thisis a contraction of "is not". It is used to represent the negative form of the verb "to be" in the third person singular (he, she, it). For example, "He isn't feeling well today".

8. "Wasn't" - This is a contraction of "was not". It is used to represent the negative form of the verb "to be" in the past tense. For example, "I wasn't able to attend the party last night".

9. "They're" - This is a contraction of "they are". It is used to represent the third person plural subject pronoun "they" followed by the auxiliary verb "are". For example, "They're coming over for dinner tonight".

10. "We'll" - This is a contraction of "we will". It is used to represent the future tense of the first person plural subject pronoun "we" followed by the auxiliary verb "will". For example, "We'll be leaving for vacation next week".

It's important to note that contractions are generally more informal than their non-contracted counterparts. They are commonly used in spoken English and in informal writing, but should be used with discretion in more formal contexts.
 
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